Welcome to Hmong Food home cooking website where you will learn the basics of Hmong cooking as well as other Asian recipes, with a few of them being my own creations. We all know asian food when we see it, but what's Hmong food? Some of what we know as Hmong Food in America today are recreations of popular asian dishes that the Hmong people have learned to cook by living amongst the Lao and Thai people. They are rich in flavors and pleasing to our taste buds such as curry, Pho beef noodle soup, papaya salad and three color drink (aka Nab Vam). You will also be guided into learning actual traditional Hmong food that is made with simple flavors which reflects Hmong people lifestyle as agriculturalists. This is the first cooking website that will share many of these traditional and modern Hmong and Asian recipes that you would particularly find on a Hmong American family dinner table.

Cellophane Noodles with Bamboo Stir Fry – Peev Choj

Peev choj - Cellophane noodle

Peev choj - Cellophane noodle

 

 

This Hmong stir fry cellophane noodles though may look peculiar to some, is no doubt delicious and can quite honestly be addictive. This stir fry noodle is often served at hmong feasts and other gatherings of friends and family. The best part about this dish is that it’s quite simple and quick to make.

Preparation: 15 minutes Cooking: 15 minutes

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Jajangmyun – Jajangmyeon – Chinese, Korean dish

JaJang Myun

JaJang Myun

 

This is my take on jajangmyun, in which i modified the recipe just a bit to fit our family’s taste. JaJangmyun is a very popular korean black bean noodle dish that has been showcased many times in Korean drama movies. It’s actually a very simple dish if you can find the right black bean paste (not black bean garlic sauce!) which are usually sold only at korean markets. they should only contain: wheat flour, soybean and maybe msg and preservatives. At other asian stores if it says black bean, and is a korean brand then you got the right stuff!

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Chinese steamed Buns – Galapao, Salapao

Galapao

Galapao

 

CHinese steamed buns somehow made its way into southeast asian cooking. The Thai people call it Salapao and some Hmong people call it Galapao. My mom used to make steam buns all the time growing up. So now every time I make galapao, everyone always snatch two or three buns so they do run out quickly. make sure you snatch yours first before calling your family out to eat! Sidenote: you can use prepared flour mix in substitute if you do not want to make it from scratch.

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Lao Crispy Fried Rice – Mov Kib Nplog

Mov Kib Nplog (Lao Fried Rice)

Mov Kib Nplog (Lao Fried Rice)

 

 

Lao Crispy Fried Rice (Nam Kao) is crunchy, sweet, salty and sour. Traditionally, you wrap this fried rice in lettuce, vietnamese coriander, cilantro and mint transforming it to a salad dish, but I prefer just eating the fried rice by itself. I actually learned how to make this from my sister who learned it from her mother in law who is Lao. Hmong people would enjoy this dish because of the sour pork sausage. Try it because you won’t regret making this dish

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Chicken Tomato Melted Stir Fry – Nqaij Qaib Kib xyaw Txiv Lwm Suav

Chicken Tomato Melted Stir Fry

Chicken Tomato Melted Stir Fry

 

 

As many Hmong parents garden they often plant and grow many tomatoes and green beans so it’s not a surprise if you find this fruit and vegetable together in a stir fry. Many hmong families love tomatoes as it makes the meat more succulant and tangy. This is a common yet delicious quick stir fry that is simple for those who don’t have much time to cook.

Preparation: 10 minutes Cooking: 15 minutes

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Samosa – Indian Appetizer

Samosa - Indian appetizer

Samosa - Indian appetizer

Preparation: 1:10 hour. Baking in Oven: 30 min

Samosa is a wonderful Indian appetizer that is believed to have traveled along the trade routes from central Asia. I myself have seen a few variations of samosas in a couple different asian cultures. My version of making Indian samosa is a bit non-traditional but a quicker and a healthier way of making Indian samosas. I first had it way back in high school when my science partner Ravneel offered me some samosas that his mother had made. I dipped them into this amazing chutney minty dipping sauce and immediately fell in love (with the food that is!). Ever since then I couldn’t stop making samosas.

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